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The Aussie Millions

It all started back in 2001 when the Crown Australian Poker Championship was created. The inclusion of the word Crown included as a testament to the fact that the event was held in the Crown Casino, Melbourne, Australia. But it wasn’t until the year 2007 that the event became known internationally as The Aussie Millions.

The first-ever main event held under the Aussie Millions banner was an A$10,000 + 500 buy-in that attracted 747-players, and the victor was a certain Great Dane known as Gus Hansen, Hansen defeating the American Jimmy Fricke - in heads-up action - to take the title, and $1,192,919 in prize money. Hansen also became famous for recording most of his hands on his Dictaphone, and later transcribing them in a best-selling book entitled ‘Every Hand Revealed.’

That same year the Crown also held an A$100,000 + 500 Super High Roller event that attracted 18-players and was won by Erick Lindgren for $795,279 - a certain Erik Seidel finishing in second place.

So that became the format for future Aussie Millions events. As you would expect there were a plethora of side-events, but the main treats for online betting fans were always the main event and super high roller. In 2012, Phil Ivey returned to the felt - after a 2011 sabbatical - and took down the $250,000 Challenge for $2,058,948.

In 2011, Erik Seidel, won $3 million dollars finishing first, and third, in the HR events and followed that up with a great year. In 2012, it was Dan Smith who won the $100,000 HR and then followed that up with a barnstorming performance.

The Aussie Millions is a proven ground. If you get it right in Oz you are likely to get it right all year round. Who will be the benefactor in 2013? We will find out in just a few short weeks.

 

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